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Having failed to persuade the end-user establishment of the necessity of paying its so-called Linux tax, the SCO Group has upped the ante and last Thursday quietly started sending letters to maybe 3,000 end users, including 41 of the Fortune 100, that have source code licenses to SVR5...
'We are taking action today to formally communicate to UNIX source code licensees and certain commercial Linux end users that they must utilize SCO's intellectual property within the bounds of their existing legal agreements and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.' So says SCO's Chri...
On December 19, in a letter reproduced here, SCO named the files that it contends breach its IP. The next move is expected to come this week from the Linux kernel developers.
UserLinux - intended to be a system for business people - will be GNOME-based and will not include Qt or KDE components by default, says project leader Bruce Perens. 'Most of the software consolidation in UserLinux is going on by consensus,' he explains. However, he saw that no consens...
The KDE Group - a group of KDE and/or Debian developers with a dedication to and interest in both projects - have written this detailed proposal opposing the decision to go with GNOME as the sole UserLinux GUI. 'We are committed towards seeing the fruitful collaboration of KDE and User...
Open Source software has grown in popularity in the West, but much remains to be known, analyzed, and measured about the importance of Open Source for developing countries. As part of an effort to identify and share evidence of how information technology can contribute to developing co...
In a letter to the LinuxWorld editors, James C. Chavez offers kudos to Novell for their recent ATT Live event.
LinuxWorld Magazine's Dee-Ann LeBlanc is up in arms, after being the repeated recipient of what she considers an unsolicited commercial e-mail...sent to her and her fellow LinuxWorld editors repeatedly 'by member of the White House's Office of Management and Budget.'
Thursday 03.22 AM EST: In the early hours of this morning, EST, the 2.6 kernel - almost two full years in the making, with improvements to scheduling, disk management and file systems, better networking and IPSec support, as well as countless bug fixes and minor improvements - has just...
The Israeli Government, according to reports, has changed course: just two weeks after its Ministry of Defense bought $28 million of 'desktop and enterprise software' from Microsoft, its Department of Commerce is initiating a strategic decision to reduce dependency on Microsoft.
The weather report for Sun - in the high performance and technical computing market anyway - is that it is enjoying a bright spell, and deployments of clustered Sun Fire V60x servers for the Linux platform have doubled.
What do you get if you mix a powerful 400MHz XScale PXA255 processor with a Linux OS and the CDMA2000 1x network of China's second largest wireless provider? Answer: a Linux-powered smartphone that may over time sell in the tens of millions.
Our midweek round-up of happenings in the Linux space, starting today with: how Microsoft has been studying Linux 'extensively.'
The newly announced backing from EMC will help VMWare achieve its goal of helping organizations to 'virtualize' their information and server structure, reports LinuxWorld Magazine's Mark R. Hinkle - our Desktop Linux Technologies editor.
Linux news-in-brief from around the world: today, it comes from a California conference, newspapers in India & Pakistan, and the two new open letters released in the 'Darl vs the open-source world' saga last week.
Is the branding of commercial Linux distros going to lead away from actually using the term 'Linux' - this is the question asked recently by Brian Proffitt.
In reponse to a query on the Groklaw site, someone has posted a very instructive crash course in the history of the Free Software/Open Source world. It's worth reading, and all its original links are here reproduced in full.
Darl's McBride's various open letters have received press attention outside Linux sites, says LinuxWorld reader James Smith, but what about the two most recent letters that have now been published in rebuttal, will they ever receive wider press attention? UPDATE: One of the authors of...
Might a new corporate strategy at Microsoft be to sow seeds of uncertainty about the legal ramifications of using open source solutions in an enterprise context?
A brief end-of-the-Week round up harvested from what's being said and written about Linux in newspapers, magazines, journals, newsletters, Web sites, and online communities. Today: US & UK surveys on Linux in business, and news about Red Hat.
Nat Friedman will be in action at a conference later this month as part of Novell's campaign to show that it means business about 'moving more aggressively into the Linux space,' as a company spokeman puts it.
Introducing a new weekly feature in which LinuxWorld tries to bring you a sense of the breadth and depth of the world's use of Linux. This week: Linux meets linguistics.
Linux heads off into deep space.
SCO's last Open Letter defending, in one breath, the SCO suit, the Digital Millenium Copyright Act, and the Supreme Court Decision in the Eldred vs. Ashcroft case draws a response from Red Hat cofounder Bob Young, and Linux doyen and head of Linux International 'maddog' Hall wasn't any...
The Open Source Development Lab isn't Microsoft...yet. But is it becoming a Microsoft wannabe? The buzz from the bees is that OSDL has now set its sights on conjuring up a Linux Desktop. THE Linux Desktop.
Was it or wasn't it a DDoS attack yesterday, as SCO alleged in its press release? In Australia, an expert says not. The Linux community is incensed, smelling a possible attempt to blacken its name. The counter-possibility that SCO Group simply has an incompetent sysadmin is being raise...
In one of those wonderful about-turns that only the technology world can trigger, a famous northwestern software company has abandoned Linux.
In a court case yesterday, a Swedish magistrate sided with Microsoft Sweden and slapped a restraining order halting LindowsOS sales in Sweden.
Linux continues to find its way into the newspapers and magazines and Web sites of the world. Here's our midweek round-up of the highlights, including one no-punches-pulled comment that Microsoft's aim is to convince the world 'that Linux is a nasty but necessary virus.'
Reuters reported yesterday that Linux is even going to be helping us all now with the weather.
The OSSI has made progress with getting the core cryptographic module of OpenSSL certified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
LinuxWorld Magazine joins with responsible leaders of the Open Source community in calling for a halt to any DDoS attacks on the SCO Group Web site.
Just a week after grumbling about what his audience supposed to be Microsoft's price inflexibility, the IT director of the UK's National Health Service says that Sun's Linux-based Java Desktop System will be put on trial throughout the service - with 800,000 licenses to play for, this ...
Here are the top twelve Linux.SYS-CON.com stories recently, in case you wanted to revisit any of them and check out the many feedback postings that they generated.
Linus Torvalds is back in action this week, and has just published a rebuttal to SCO Group supremo Darl McBride's 'Open Letter on Copyrights' of last week.
Rank them yourself and let us know how your choices would differ...or add your own.
Linus Torvalds, in an e-mail exchange with with Red Hat's Arjan van de Ven, Larry McVoy of bitmover.com, Erik B. Anderson and others, discussed in detail last week the relationship - in his view - between 'binary only' kernel modules and the GPL.
More Linux tidbits to start your week with, culled from the world's media - newspapers, magazines, Websites, and online communities.
SCO now has just 30 days to respond to IBM's demands for details about the Linux code the Utah-based company has been claiming encroaches on its intellectual property. The decision, weclomed by IBM, came on Friday from a magistrate of the U.S. District Court in Utah.
No competition this week: Linus wins hands-down, by popular acclaim, with his witty response to Darl McBride's latest 'Open Letter on Copyrights.' Enjoy!


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