Comments
yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
Cloud Computing
Conference & Expo
November 2-4, 2009 NYC
Register Today and SAVE !..

2008 West
DIAMOND SPONSOR:
Data Direct
SOA, WOA and Cloud Computing: The New Frontier for Data Services
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Red Hat
The Opening of Virtualization
GOLD SPONSORS:
Appsense
User Environment Management – The Third Layer of the Desktop
Cordys
Cloud Computing for Business Agility
EMC
CMIS: A Multi-Vendor Proposal for a Service-Based Content Management Interoperability Standard
Freedom OSS
Practical SOA” Max Yankelevich
Intel
Architecting an Enterprise Service Router (ESR) – A Cost-Effective Way to Scale SOA Across the Enterprise
Sensedia
Return on Assests: Bringing Visibility to your SOA Strategy
Symantec
Managing Hybrid Endpoint Environments
VMWare
Game-Changing Technology for Enterprise Clouds and Applications
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts

2008 West
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Appcelerator
Get ‘Rich’ Quick: Rapid Prototyping for RIA with ZERO Server Code
Keynote Systems
Designing for and Managing Performance in the New Frontier of Rich Internet Applications
GOLD SPONSORS:
ICEsoft
How Can AJAX Improve Homeland Security?
Isomorphic
Beyond Widgets: What a RIA Platform Should Offer
Oracle
REAs: Rich Enterprise Applications
Click For 2008 Event Webcasts
In many cases, the end of the year gives you time to step back and take stock of the last 12 months. This is when many of us take a hard look at what worked and what did not, complete performance reviews, and formulate plans for the coming year. For me, it is all of those things plus a time when I u...
SYS-CON.TV
Majority of Americans Foresee Smartphone Payments Replacing Cards and Cash
Yet few show strong, immediate interest in doing so themselves

NEW YORK, Dec. 11, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Just imagine it:  you're holiday shopping, or perhaps ordering a drink at your favorite coffee shop.  While the gift wrappers start cutting colorful paper or the barista begins steaming your nonfat soy milk, you settle the bill with a simple tap of your smartphone against the merchant's point-of-service terminal.  It's not the future you're looking at – the technology is already here, albeit at an emerging level.  A combined 13% of Americans indicate that they have either paid in this manner themselves (4%) or witnessed it firsthand (8%), with predictably stronger experience levels among smartphone owners (18%, 7% and 11%, respectively). 

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100517/NY06256LOGO)

But is this just a passing gimmick, or the first indicator of a fundamental shift in how Americans are likely to pay for goods and services in the years to come?  The majority of Americans appear to be anticipating the latter, with over six in ten indicating that they believe smartphone payments will eventually replace both payment card (66%) and cash (61%) transactions for a majority of purchases.

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,383 adults surveyed online between November 14 and 19, 2012 by Harris Interactive.

Change is down the road – but not necessarily around the corner…

While many Americans perceive this change in payment culture as a likely eventuality, considerably fewer appear to perceive it as imminent:  although the aforementioned two-thirds (66%) believe smartphone payments will eventually replace payment card transactions, considerably fewer (32%) believe this will happen in less than five years.  Similarly, fewer than half of those Americans who believe smartphone payments will eventually replace cash for the majority of purchases (61%) believe this will happen in less than five years (26%).

…And not necessarily for me

Despite the majority of Americans indicating that such changes to our collective purchasing habits are ahead, few display a strong interest in replacing their own cash or card transactions with the tap of a smartphone.  Although over one-fourth of Americans (27%) and nearly half of smartphone users (44%) report overall interest in being able to use their smartphone to process in-person payments, far fewer specify being very interested in doing so (8% and 16%, respectively).  Nonetheless, it is worth noting that overall interest levels point to some segments which are most interested overall in this ability:

  • Echo Boomers (40%) and Gen Xers (34%), perhaps predictably, display considerably stronger interest in doing so than either Baby Boomers (18%) or Matures (7%).
  • Men (32%) are significantly more interested in this technology than women (22%).
  • Those in households with children (38%) also display considerably stronger overall interest than those in households with none (22%).

Among those who indicate being either not very or not at all interested in being able to make smartphone payments, security is a clear, if predictable, factor:  half (51%) say they don't want to store sensitive information on their phone, and four in ten (40%) don't want to transmit sensitive information to a merchant's device.  Another predictable impediment is the simple matter of smartphone ownership, with half (50%) indicating they are not interested in doing so because they don't use a smartphone.  The other top impediment speaks to a deeper issue facing the mobile payment industry:  just over half of those not interested (52%) indicate that they simply don't see any reason to switch from cash or payment cards.

  • Looking specifically at smartphone owners not interested in using their devices to process payments, security concerns (68% don't want to store sensitive information on their phones, 51% don't want to transmit sensitive information to the merchant's device) and general apathy toward such a shift (62% don't see any reason to switch) are stronger still.

Even initiatives to more seamlessly integrate smartphones into our payment habits appear to carry only moderate potential to move the needle on Americans' interest.  While just over one-fourth of Americans (28%) and four in ten smartphone owners (40%) indicate that being able to make mobile payments while still taking advantage of their existing credit card reward programs would make them more interested in doing so, far fewer (9% and 15%, respectively) specify that they would be much more interested.  Moreover, only 8% of those not interested in paying with smartphones indicate that this would make them more so (and only 1% indicate it would make them much more so).    

Similarly, when asked how the ability to use their smartphones as a "digital wallet" with electronic versions of all the identifications, loyalty program cards and other documentation normally carried in a wallet – thereby allowing them to leave their physical wallets at home – three in ten Americans (30%) and over four in ten smartphone owners (43%) indicate it would make them more interested in doing so, but far fewer (8% and 12%, respectively) specify that it would make them much more interested.  Only 12% of those not interested in paying with smartphones overall indicate that this would make them more interested (and only 2% indicate it would make them much more interested).   

So what?

When debit cards came to prominence, they did so by responding to a genuine consumer desire – even if consumers weren't aware of that desire until the solution presented itself.  By combining the use-anywhere convenience of a credit card with the ability to draw from money in users' checking accounts instead of incurring debt, this new product fundamentally changed how Americans paid for goods and services, eventually outpacing cash as the top payment type.

Thus far, the mobile payment industry has yet to find a similar "in" with consumers.  Finding such a silver bullet which gives Americans a reason to change how they pay will depend not only on bringing new ideas to the table simply because technology enables them – but paying attention to how Americans pay now and looking for a need that, once again, they may not even know is there.


TABLE 1a
EXPERIENCE WITH MOBILE TRANSACTION TYPES
[Summary Table]
"Please select the statement which best describes your experience with each of the following types of transactions."

Base: All U.S. adults


Done this myself / Seen it done firsthand [NET]

I have done this myself

I have not done this, but I have seen it done firsthand

I have not done or witnessed this, but I am aware that it is possible

I was unaware that this is possible

%

%

%

%

%

Using a mobile app that allows you to redeem offers at a retailer or restaurant like you would use a coupon

26

15

11

52

22

Paying for a product or service with a credit card and having your card swiped through an attachment on the seller's smartphone

25

14

11

54

21

Using a mobile scan as an airline, train, mass transit or other transportation ticket

17

7

10

51

32

Using a mobile app like a gift card to make purchases at a retailer, restaurant or other merchant

16

6

9

54

30

Using a mobile scan as an admission ticket to movies, concerts or live theater performances

15

6

9

53

31

Processing a payment by tapping your smartphone against a special receiver at a store or other merchant, instead of using cash or a payment card

13

4

8

56

32

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

TABLE 1b
EXPERIENCE WITH MOBILE TRANSACTION TYPES
[Summary Table Among Smartphone Users]
 "Please select the statement which best describes your experience with each of the following types of transactions."

Base: Smartphone Users


Done this myself / Seen it done firsthand [NET]

I have done this myself

I have not done this, but I have seen it done firsthand

I have not done or witnessed this, but I am aware that it is possible

I was unaware that this is possible

%

%

%

%

%

Using a mobile app that allows you to redeem offers at a retailer or restaurant like you would use a coupon

40

29

11

47

13

Paying for a product or service with a credit card and having your card swiped through an attachment on the seller's smartphone

35

23

13

52

13

Using a mobile scan as an airline, train, mass transit or other transportation ticket

26

12

14

52

22

Using a mobile scan as an admission ticket to movies, concerts or live theater performances

23

11

12

54

23

Using a mobile app like a gift card to make purchases at a retailer, restaurant or other merchant

22

10

12

53

25

Processing a payment by tapping your smartphone against a special receiver at a store or other merchant, instead of using cash or a payment card

18

7

11

57

25

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

TABLE 2
EXPECTED TIME WHEN SMARTPHONE PAYMENTS WILL REPLACE CARDS/CASH FOR MAJORITY OF PURCHASES
 "Thinking ahead, please say when, if ever, you think smartphone payments will replace transactions for a majority of purchases?"

Base: All U.S. adults


Total

Smartphone Users



%

%


Payment Card Transactions




EVER [NET]

66

76


In less than 5 years [sub-NET]

32

38


Within the next year

2

2


1 year to less than 3 years

12

14


3 years to less than 5 years

19

21


5 years to less than 10 years

19

21


10 years or more

15

17


Never

34

24






Cash Transactions




EVER [NET]

61

70


In less than 5 years [sub-NET]

26

31


Within the next year

2

2


1 year to less than 3 years

9

12


3 years to less than 5 years

16

18


5 years to less than 10 years

18

21


10 years or more

17

18


Never

39

30


Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

TABLE 3
INTEREST IN USING SMARTPHONE TO PROCESS IN-PERSON PAYMENTS
[by Smartphone Users, Generation, Gender & Children in HH]
 "How interested are you in being able to use your smartphone to process in-person payments via tapping a special receiver, rather than using cash or payment cards?"

Base: All U.S. adults


Total

Smart-phone Users

Generation

Gender

Children <18 in HH

Echo

Boomers

(18-35)

Gen Xers

(36-47)

Baby Boomers

(48-66)

Matures

(67+)

Male

Female

Yes

No

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

"Very" or "Somewhat" Interested [NET]

27

44

40

34

18

7

32

22

38

22

Very interested in using my smartphone instead of cash or cards

8

16

13

12

5

1

10

7

15

6

Somewhat interested in using my smartphone instead of cash or cards

19

28

27

22

13

7

22

15

24

16

"Not very" or "Not at all" Interested [NET]

56

47

46

53

62

67

52

59

47

60

Not very interested in using my smartphone instead of cash or cards

12

16

18

13

10

5

11

14

15

11

Not at all interested in using my smartphone instead of cash or cards

43

30

28

40

52

62

41

46

32

48

Not at all sure

17

9

13

13

20

26

16

19

15

18

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

TABLE 4
REASON FOR LACK OF INTEREST IN USING A SMARTPHONE TO PROCESS PAYMENTS
 "Why aren't you interested in using a smartphone to process payments instead of cash or cards?"

Base: U.S. Adults "Not very" or "Not at all" interested in using a smartphone to process in-person transactions


Total

Smartphone Users



%

%


Don't see any reason to switch from cash or payment cards

52

62


Don't want to store sensitive information on my phone

51

68


Don't use a smartphone

50

2


Don't want to transmit sensitive information to the merchant's device

40

51


Worried that my smartphone might lose data service / connection (out of range, underground, etc.) and leave me unable to pay

25

32


Worried that my smartphone's battery will run out and leave me unable to pay

15

22


Don't understand how to use it

8

8


Don't know where I can use it

7

9


Something else

7

6


Note: Multiple responses allowed.

TABLE 5
IMPACT OF CC REWARDS PROGRAMS ON INTEREST IN USING SMARTPHONE TO MAKE IN-PERSON PAYMENTS
 "If you could use this type of 'mobile payments' while still taking advantage of your existing credit card rewards programs, how would this affect your interest in using your smartphone to make in-person payments?"

Base: All U.S. adults


Total

Smartphone Users

"Not very" or "Not at all"
interesting in using smartphone
to make in-person
payments

%

%

%

"Much more" or "Somewhat more" Interested [NET]

28

40

8

Much more interested

9

15

1

Somewhat more interested

18

25

7

No impact

43

46

60

"Somewhat less" or "Much less" Interested [NET]

9

8

14

Somewhat less interested

3

3

4

Much less interested

6

5

10

Not applicable

20

6

18

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

TABLE 6
IMPACT OF "DIGITAL WALLET" ON INTEREST IN USING SMARTPHONE TO MAKE IN-PERSON PAYMENTS
"If you could also use your smartphone as a 'digital wallet' with electronic versions of your driver's license, health insurance cards, loyalty program identification, and anything else you might normally carry in your wallet – thus allowing you to leave your physical wallet at home - how would this affect your interest in using your smartphone to make in-person payments?"

Base: All U.S. adults


Total

Smartphone Users

"Not very" or "Not at all"
interesting in using
smartphone
to make in-person payments

%

%

%

"Much more" or "Somewhat more" Interested [NET]

30

43

12

Much more interested

8

12

2

Somewhat more interested

22

31

10

No impact

46

37

55

"Somewhat less" or "Much less" Interested [NET]

24

20

33

Somewhat less interested

6

7

8

Much less interested

18

14

25

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

Methodology

This Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States between November 14 and 19, 2012 among 2,383 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents' propensity to be online.

All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words "margin of error" as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Interactive surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the Harris Interactive panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

These statements conform to the principles of disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The results of this Harris Poll may not be used in advertising, marketing or promotion without the prior written permission of Harris Interactive.

The Harris Poll® #66, December 11, 2012
By: Larry Shannon-Missal, Harris Poll Research Manager

About Harris Interactive

Harris Interactive is one of the world's leading market research firms, leveraging research, technology, and business acumen to transform relevant insight into actionable foresight. Known widely for the Harris Poll® and for pioneering innovative research methodologies, Harris offers proprietary solutions in the areas of market and customer insight, corporate brand and reputation strategy, and marketing, advertising, public relations and communications research. Harris possesses expertise in a wide range of industries including health care, technology, public affairs, energy, telecommunications, financial services, insurance, media, retail, restaurant, and consumer package goods. Additionally, Harris has a portfolio of multi-client offerings that complement our custom solutions while maximizing our client's research investment. Serving clients in more than 196 countries and territories through our North American and European offices, Harris specializes in delivering research solutions that help us - and our clients—stay ahead of what's next. For more information, please visit www.harrisinteractive.com.

Press Contacts:
Corporate Communications
Harris Interactive
212-539-9600
press@harrisinteractive.com

 

SOURCE Harris Interactive

About PR Newswire
Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

SOA World Latest Stories
People often ask how Qubell is different from Chef, Puppet, OpenShift, Docker, Heat, Ansible, Mesos, Kubernetes or some other hip product du jour. Like any comparison of apples to oranges, the answer involves a surprisingly deep investigation into botanical conventions, differences bet...
Appcore automates the business of cloud computing by delivering cloud automation management platforms for enterprise private clouds and service provider public clouds. Appcore AMP™ is cloud automation designed to simplify cloud environments through a single management and monitoring in...
AppZero, a fast, flexible way to move enterprise applications to the cloud, has announced that AppZero Cloud Edition is available to try on Amazon Web Services (AWS) free of charge, as an AWS Test Drive. AppZero's award-winning application migration tool enables users to move server a...
Sovereign and Virtustream partnered to deliver Sovereign’s SAP® BusinessObjects driven Analytics and Business Intelligence solutions on Virtustream's xStream™ cloud management platform (CMP). This alliance will drive operational efficiencies and competitive advantage for Sovereign’s en...
A lot of people are heralding IoT as the future, but what can your business do today? Quite a lot, it turns out, if you know what to look for and how to talk about it. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Reid Carlberg, Senior Director at Salesforce.com, will discuss business processes ripe ...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Solgenia, the global market leader in Cloud Collaboration and Cloud Infrastructure software solutions, will exhibit at SYS-CON's 15th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 4–6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Sant...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET News.com Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)sys-con.com!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)sys-con.com! 201 802-3021


SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers
ADS BY GOOGLE