Comments
yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
Cloud Computing
Conference & Expo
November 2-4, 2009 NYC
Register Today and SAVE !..

2008 West
DIAMOND SPONSOR:
Data Direct
SOA, WOA and Cloud Computing: The New Frontier for Data Services
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Red Hat
The Opening of Virtualization
GOLD SPONSORS:
Appsense
User Environment Management – The Third Layer of the Desktop
Cordys
Cloud Computing for Business Agility
EMC
CMIS: A Multi-Vendor Proposal for a Service-Based Content Management Interoperability Standard
Freedom OSS
Practical SOA” Max Yankelevich
Intel
Architecting an Enterprise Service Router (ESR) – A Cost-Effective Way to Scale SOA Across the Enterprise
Sensedia
Return on Assests: Bringing Visibility to your SOA Strategy
Symantec
Managing Hybrid Endpoint Environments
VMWare
Game-Changing Technology for Enterprise Clouds and Applications
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts

2008 West
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Appcelerator
Get ‘Rich’ Quick: Rapid Prototyping for RIA with ZERO Server Code
Keynote Systems
Designing for and Managing Performance in the New Frontier of Rich Internet Applications
GOLD SPONSORS:
ICEsoft
How Can AJAX Improve Homeland Security?
Isomorphic
Beyond Widgets: What a RIA Platform Should Offer
Oracle
REAs: Rich Enterprise Applications
Click For 2008 Event Webcasts
In many cases, the end of the year gives you time to step back and take stock of the last 12 months. This is when many of us take a hard look at what worked and what did not, complete performance reviews, and formulate plans for the coming year. For me, it is all of those things plus a time when I u...
SYS-CON.TV
JDJ Cover Story — Agile Java Development with Spring, Hibernate, & Eclipse
A roadmap for building enterprise-class applications using agile methods a POJOs

After getting a head of gray hairs and a quickly receding hairline, I have learned that the simplest solutions are often the best. Having worked with Java since 1995 and various software development lifecycle methodologies over the years, I have seen things grow complex in these areas. Thanks to some new lighter-weight Java tools and agile methods, I can provide a fresh perspective on developing Java applications in an agile manner.

This article is different from typical Java articles for two reasons. First, instead of providing in-depth details on some API or cool tool, it provides a roadmap for building enterprise-class Java applications using agile methods and plain old Java objects (POJOs). Second, it covers a lot of ground, from conceptualization through deployment, so for the sake of brevity, there are minimal code excerpts; however, there's a completely functional sample timesheet application called Time Expression (with source code) built using Spring, Hibernate, Junit, and Ant available at visualpatterns.com/resources.jsp.

We have a lot to cover so let's get started.

Agile Manifesto
In 2001, 17 software experts (including Martin Fowler, Kent Beck, and Jon Kern) got together to discuss lightweight approaches to software development; they jointly defined the term agile. The outcome of this was the "Manifesto for Agile Software Development," a set of values and principles for these agile methods.

The term agile incorporates a wide range of methods; some of them include Extreme Programming (XP), Scrum, Feature Driven Development, Agile Modeling, and Crystal. Many methodologies tend to include both process and modeling since they often go hand-in-hand; we will look at both next. For details on the Agile Manifesto and various agile methods, visit the agilemanifesto.org and agilealliance.org Web sites.

Agile Processes
One of easiest agile processes to understand is Scrum. While XP tends to steal the limelight in the agile community, it's a bit more involved than Scrum. However, the two are highly complementary since XP provides a set of excellent engineering practices whereas Scrum is more about product/project management. In fact, these days I tend to recommend becoming "agile" by bringing in Scrum first, then adding XP practices one at a time, as and when needed since moving entirely to XP-based development (from waterfall) is a rude awakening for many organizations and requires a fundamental mind shift that many projects aren't ready for.

So, how does Scrum work? Simple. We gather a list of new features or change requests for an application in a product backlog. For our sample application, Time Expression, these could include:

  • Hourly employees will be able to sign in to a Web application and enter their hours for each day of a given week.
  • The employee's manager must approve the timesheet.
  • After a timesheet is approved or disapproved, notification is sent to the employee indicating the updated status of the timesheet.
  • And so on...
From here, we simply take the highest-priority features, move them to a sprint backlog, and implement them in one-month (or shorter) iterations called sprints, and continue having monthly sprints till all the features are implemented. Each sprint (or iteration) contains the entire software lifecycle, in other words, detailed requirements/analysis, design, coding, unit/acceptance testing, and deployment of production-ready code. Scrum also suggests having a planning meeting at the beginning of a sprint and a review at the end of the sprint to discuss lessons learned or the next set of features to implement in the following sprint. Other than that, we have a short daily meeting (say, 15 minutes) to discuss the project's status. Figure 1 depicts the Scrum process. Visit controlchaos.com for details on Scrum.

A common theme of agile processes is iterative development. For example, XP works like Scrum, however, it uses the concept of quarterly releases with weekly iterations as shown in Figure 2. Also the features are provided in the form of user stories, typically written by the customer using one to three lines to describe the feature. My explanation of XP is overly simplified; there's a lot more to it such as pair programming, sit together, and continuous build. Visit extremeprogramming.org for details on XP.

So now we've looked at two agile processes, Scrum and XP. These help in gathering user feature requests and overall project management. However, as developers, we need to implement features by engineering them into software applications, so let's look at agile modeling techniques next, which can help us bridge the gap between user requirements and coding.

Agile Design
According to thefreedictionary.com, a model is "a preliminary work or construction that serves as a plan from which a final product is to be made...used in testing or perfecting a final product." So here I'll use the word "model" to describe diagrams and other artifacts.

Agile Model-Driven Development
Agile Model-Driven Development (AMDD) created by Scott Ambler provides guidelines for effective modeling. Instead of creating extensive models, AMDD recommends creating "good enough" models. One of my favorite Scott quotes is "your goal is to build a shared understanding, it isn't to write detailed documentation."

AMDD suggests two categories of models, requirements and architecture. Requirements models could include a domain model (Figure 3), usage models such as user stories or use cases (Figure 4), and UI models such as prototypes and flow map (Figure 5 and Figure 6).

Architecture models could include a freeform model like the one shown in Figure 7.

There really isn't a whole lot more to AMDD since it provides minimal guidelines for agile modeling. Visit agilemodeling.com for more details.

Agile Draw
Before moving to the next topic, let me briefly mention a new and elegantly simple technique called Agile Draw, which was used to draw Figures 3-7. This technique provides an alternative to the heavy-handed Unified Modeling Language (UML) but can also be used to complement UML. Agile Draw provides minimum guidelines for modeling and additional guidelines for adding appeal to these models using graphic design concepts. The core concepts behind Agile Draw include four basic components that make it a virtually notation-free modeling technique; these concepts include circles, boxes, lines, and text. Using them you can draw practically any model by hand or with a drawing program.

Visit agiledraw.org for more details.

Refactoring
One of the core aspects of agile methods is not to do too much design upfront so you can start showing results to the customer quickly by developing actual software versus producing comprehensive documentation that no one actually reads or maintains. Of course, the downside is that it cuts down on the amount of design done for an application. However, this isn't necessarily a bad thing since most programmers find better ways of doing things once they begin coding.

For example, we find cleaner ways of structuring our code after the first pass at it, perhaps by improving our own design or because we learned a better way of using a framework (such as Hibernate or Spring). This code improvement is known as refactoring and is considered a continuous design activity.

Refactoring is more than fluff; it's now appearing as a menu option in integrated development environments such as Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA. Visit Martin Fowler's Web site, refactoring.com, for more information on refactoring along with a catalog of many refactoring techniques.

Other Design Considerations
While refactoring can help improve code, there might be other things you should consider upfront or in the first couple of iterations. Some of these include schemes for transaction management, exception handling, clustering, and application security (authentication, authorization, and encryption). Any enterprise-class project that doesn't at least consider these "big picture factors" upfront is asking for trouble later. One common problem found in XP projects is that a lot left for refactoring later never happens. Drawing bare-minimum architecture models like the one shown in Figure 7 upfront can help with general discussions about the important design considerations I've mentioned here.


About Anil Hemrajani
Anil Hemrajani is the author of the book titled Agile Java Development with Spring, Hibernate and Eclipse. He is the founder of Isavix Corporation (now InScope Solutions, Inc.), a successful IT services company, and DeveloperHub.com (formerly isavix.net), an award-winning online developer community that grew to over 100,000 registered members. He has twenty years of experience in the Information Technology community working with several Fortune 100 companies and also smaller organizations. He has published numerous articles in well known trade journals, presented around the world, and received and/or nominated for several awards. Anil can be reached via his web site, VisualPatterns.com.

In order to post a comment you need to be registered and logged in.

Register | Sign-in

Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

barcode scanner integration with java spring

Hey Jeff, JDJ used all of the lastest Agile methods to develop their pages, so you see it's fast, it's now, it works! Far be it from me to stand in the way of progress. Give me a break, none of this crap has infiltrated coporate computing in the least. Just go back and code like the rest of us and stop patting each other on the back for your supposed genius.

I'm sure the author is well-meaning but when we're bombarded daily with titles like "The Four Quantum States of Ajax" I just gotta laugh. Do you really think all this stuff is changing anything?!

The engineering world wants real engineering not something built on top of existing frameworks decades old that works and works well.

Holy crud, the pop up ad blocks the entire story even at 1360 x 768. Do you really need an Ad that big that requires a click to close? There are already adds on both margins and the in the header and Footer, the content is a thin ribbon down the center that get blocked by yet another ad. Just seems silly to me.


Your Feedback
JDJAgile wrote: Hey Jeff, JDJ used all of the lastest Agile methods to develop their pages, so you see it's fast, it's now, it works! Far be it from me to stand in the way of progress. Give me a break, none of this crap has infiltrated coporate computing in the least. Just go back and code like the rest of us and stop patting each other on the back for your supposed genius. I'm sure the author is well-meaning but when we're bombarded daily with titles like "The Four Quantum States of Ajax" I just gotta laugh. Do you really think all this stuff is changing anything?! The engineering world wants real engineering not something built on top of existing frameworks decades old that works and works well.
Jeff wrote: Holy crud, the pop up ad blocks the entire story even at 1360 x 768. Do you really need an Ad that big that requires a click to close? There are already adds on both margins and the in the header and Footer, the content is a thin ribbon down the center that get blocked by yet another ad. Just seems silly to me.
SOA World Latest Stories
Explosive growth in connected devices. Enormous amounts of data for collection and analysis. Critical use of data for split-second decision making and actionable information. All three are factors in making the Internet of Things a reality. Yet, any one factor would have an IT organiza...
In his general session at 19th Cloud Expo, Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, discussed how Dice leverages data insights and tools to help both tech professionals and recruiters better understand how skills relate to each other and which skills are in high demand usin...
Without a clear strategy for cost control and an architecture designed with cloud services in mind, costs and operational performance can quickly get out of control. To avoid multiple architectural redesigns requires extensive thought and planning. Boundary (now part of BMC) launched a...
All organizations that did not originate this moment have a pre-existing culture as well as legacy technology and processes that can be more or less amenable to DevOps implementation. That organizational culture is influenced by the personalities and management styles of Executive Mana...
Without lifecycle traceability and visibility across the tool chain, stakeholders from Planning-to-Ops have limited insight and answers to who, what, when, why and how across the DevOps lifecycle. This impacts the ability to deliver high quality software at the needed velocity to drive...
We all know that end users experience the internet primarily with mobile devices. From an app development perspective, we know that successfully responding to the needs of mobile customers depends on rapid DevOps – failing fast, in short, until the right solution evolves in your custom...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET News.com Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)sys-con.com!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)sys-con.com! 201 802-3021


SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers
ADS BY GOOGLE