Comments
yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
Cloud Computing
Conference & Expo
November 2-4, 2009 NYC
Register Today and SAVE !..

2008 West
DIAMOND SPONSOR:
Data Direct
SOA, WOA and Cloud Computing: The New Frontier for Data Services
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Red Hat
The Opening of Virtualization
GOLD SPONSORS:
Appsense
User Environment Management – The Third Layer of the Desktop
Cordys
Cloud Computing for Business Agility
EMC
CMIS: A Multi-Vendor Proposal for a Service-Based Content Management Interoperability Standard
Freedom OSS
Practical SOA” Max Yankelevich
Intel
Architecting an Enterprise Service Router (ESR) – A Cost-Effective Way to Scale SOA Across the Enterprise
Sensedia
Return on Assests: Bringing Visibility to your SOA Strategy
Symantec
Managing Hybrid Endpoint Environments
VMWare
Game-Changing Technology for Enterprise Clouds and Applications
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts

2008 West
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Appcelerator
Get ‘Rich’ Quick: Rapid Prototyping for RIA with ZERO Server Code
Keynote Systems
Designing for and Managing Performance in the New Frontier of Rich Internet Applications
GOLD SPONSORS:
ICEsoft
How Can AJAX Improve Homeland Security?
Isomorphic
Beyond Widgets: What a RIA Platform Should Offer
Oracle
REAs: Rich Enterprise Applications
Click For 2008 Event Webcasts
In many cases, the end of the year gives you time to step back and take stock of the last 12 months. This is when many of us take a hard look at what worked and what did not, complete performance reviews, and formulate plans for the coming year. For me, it is all of those things plus a time when I u...
SYS-CON.TV
Has Sun Waited Too Long To Open-Source Its Java Implementations?
"Microsoft's position has improved and now there's Zend"

The open-sourcing of Java began on Monday - at six million lines of code, it will be one of the biggest open source contributions ever, representing a shift in thinking by Sun. But has it waited too long to make the move? Microsoft's position has improved and now there's Zend.

Plus it will take until the first half of '07 for all of the Java code that's going be open sourced to be open sourced. Naturally, there's always the chance that it will be forked. Sun's counting on any incompatible forks not gaining any traction.

Actually Sun is not open-sourcing the Java programming language or the platform APIs or Java specifications. It's open sourcing its implementation of the Java Standard Edition (Java SE) and a buildable implementation of Java Micro Edition (Java ME), stuff that comes from an early build of JDK 7, under the General Public License (GPL), the open source touchstone that Sun never much liked before.

It's using GPL 2.0, the open source license favored by Linux creator Linus Torvalds, and not the GPL 3.0 currently in rewrite that Torvalds abhors.

Sun said it's using the GPL - which it knows won't make everybody happy - because it figures the GPL would result in the "greatest incremental growth to the Java market." Sun wants to get Java included in the LAMP stack and bundled with Linux distributions.

Specifically, it's talking about Java HotSpot, the javac Java compiler and JavaHelp. It said a buildable JDK would be available in Q1.

HotSpot is Sun's implementation of the JVM, a core component of the Java Runtime Environment that translates Java code to the different operating systems and chip architectures, and javac generates the proper bytecode for execution. JavaHelp is the online documentation that goes along with the JDK.

Sun says it's releasing the class libraries and the parts of the virtual machine that expose public APIs under the GPLv2 Classpath exception developed by the Free Software Foundation that will let any application, GPL or otherwise, link to the library without that application having to be open-sourced.

Like the Lesser GPL (LGPL), it basically breaks the endless open source cycle.

Sun says the technology it's releasing will let developers port the JVM to new hardware architectures and operating systems, fix bugs, and contribute new SE features through a new so-called OpenJDK Project. Sun said it would evolve the existing JDK Community into OpenJDK, though its governance model hasn't been fully worked out yet.

However the model evolves, Sun will decide what OpenJDK contributions to take. It expects to have non-Sun committers. Sun will also police the use of the Java brand and logo.

The Java ME code is accessible through Java.net along with a testing and compatibility framework. Sun says it will release the framework for the Java Device Test Suite later this year. Initially, it's just the runtime for mass-market handsets. Sun promises to release the runtime for devices like smartphones and set-top boxes at some point.

Sun says it's open-sourcing ME to "accelerate the development and evolution of the platform, reduce fragmentation, and drive down development costs."

Sun adds that it's going to open source the Java Platform Enterprise Edition (Java EE) under the GPL. Java EE has been available for the last year under the company's own CCDL license via Project Glassfish, which will be released under a dual-license model in the first quarter, both the GPLv2 with the Classpath exception and the existing GPL-grudging CDDL.

Sun claims 3.8 billion Java-enabled devices, a number that stems heavily from phones and smart cards. Phones account for something like 1.5 billion deployments.

There's encumbered code in Java - particularly in the 2D graphics - like the color management library, font rasterizer and graphics rasterizer - that Sun intends to continue to use in commercial releases until it's replaced with fully functional open source alternatives. It appears that the encumbrances are holding up the release of the whole JDK.

There won't be any binaries before next spring and then Sun's pretty sure they'll be encumbered. It's working out a special GPL v2 exception with the Free Software Foundation, keepers of the GPL flame, and the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) that will allow downstream redistribution of encumbered binaries and a JDK built from the GPL'd sources and the encumbered binaries.

Sun will continue to offer binary bundles for the JDK and JRE under its Binary Code License (BCL). It says it will offer Distribution License for Java (DLJ) bundles for Linux and OpenSolaris.

The ME code is also encumbered and Sun says what's open-sourced won't include support for specific phone hardware, graphics engine, sound engine and some other stuff. It says it's trying to negotiate with the IP owners. Sun says it can use other licenses for the open source code base because it owns the copyright on the code base and it's inherent in copyright law.

When it can, Sun intends to open-source both JDK 6 and JDK 7, the first a stable release and the other a platform to innovate on.

Sun will only open some of its test suites, but "not all and not all at once." It says it will make as much of its regression and unit-test suite available as "practical," and some of the functional tests "eventually." It says some tests have dependencies on internal test frameworks, test harnesses or environments that aren't available outside of Sun.

It will create a portal to work on testing with the community and have Technology Compatibility Kits (TCKs) for compliance. Sun, however, hasn't figured out how to make the TCKs accessible.

Sun's source control management and bug tracking systems are also proprietary and off-limits.

Developers will be asked to sign a Sun Contribution Agreement (SCA) that grants Sun joint ownership in copyright and a patent license to their contributions.

Sun says sharing copyrights protects the Java Community, enabling Sun to offer the Java platform as a whole under both open source and commercial licenses and to know where every line comes from in case of future litigation.

Meanwhile, the Apache Software Foundation intends to keep on trucking and produce the open source version of Java started 18 months ago as Project Harmony. It should have something to show by the middle of next year.

See www.sun.com/opensource/java.

Copyright (c) Client Server News.

About Open Source News
Enterprise Open Source News Desk trawls the fast-growing world of Professional Open Source for business-relevant items of news, opinion, and insight.

In order to post a comment you need to be registered and logged in.

Register | Sign-in

Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

Sun says it's releasing the class libraries and the parts of the virtual machine that expose public APIs under the GPLv2 Classpath exception developed by the Free Software Foundation that will let any application, GPL or otherwise, link to the library without that application having to be open-sourced.

Perhaps the best news that can come from this is that the three major platforms can potentially converge. Currently Sun, IBM, and BEA all have their own Java VMs. While compatibility is remarkably good for a specific version, each has their own strengths and weaknesses, performance wise. Each also utilize non-compatible tuning parameters and such.

A unified code base can potentially reduce these differences. We might have a single JVM that incorporates the best performance features of all three products, and can be tuned in a consistent way.

Perhaps the best news that can come from this is that the three major platforms can potentially converge. Currently Sun, IBM, and BEA all have their own Java VMs. While compatibility is remarkably good for a specific version, each has their own strengths and weaknesses, performance wise. Each also utilize non-compatible tuning parameters and such.

A unified code base can potentially reduce these differences. We might have a single JVM that incorporates the best performance features of all three products, and can be tuned in a consistent way.

I would like to know which parts of Java aren't being open-sourced. I do hope they aren't critical.

Having shunned away from Java due to its license for years, I look forward to another good free-as-in-speech tool under my belt.

Just to make it clear: Java is going to have the GPL with the Classpath-exception, which explicitely allows to create closed source applications when using the standard libraries.

See Gosling's blog:
http://blogs.sun.com/jag/

and here you'll find the mentioned exception:
http://www.gnu.org/software/classpath/license.html.

My only worry is is that we'll see applications built on custom versions of Java that aren't compatible with each other or have fixed bugs differently to how someone else has fixed them.

Hopefully Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora will just take the current version of Java, compile it with all the bugs still intact (I'm not kidding!!) and stick it in the repositories.

The class libraries have the linking exception.

Tp.

Despite all the rumours, I never really believed Sun would release Java under GPL instead of CDDL. Hats off to Sun.

I assume the class libraries are also under GPL. The question I now have is, have they explicitly given a GPL linking exception for the class libraries to avoid GPL tainting Java code? Rather than implicitly saying there's no problem, I hope they make an explicit exception similar to the one given for FSF's libgcc or libstdc++.


Your Feedback
JDJ News Desk wrote: Sun says it's releasing the class libraries and the parts of the virtual machine that expose public APIs under the GPLv2 Classpath exception developed by the Free Software Foundation that will let any application, GPL or otherwise, link to the library without that application having to be open-sourced.
RevMike wrote: Perhaps the best news that can come from this is that the three major platforms can potentially converge. Currently Sun, IBM, and BEA all have their own Java VMs. While compatibility is remarkably good for a specific version, each has their own strengths and weaknesses, performance wise. Each also utilize non-compatible tuning parameters and such. A unified code base can potentially reduce these differences. We might have a single JVM that incorporates the best performance features of all three products, and can be tuned in a consistent way.
RevMike wrote: Perhaps the best news that can come from this is that the three major platforms can potentially converge. Currently Sun, IBM, and BEA all have their own Java VMs. While compatibility is remarkably good for a specific version, each has their own strengths and weaknesses, performance wise. Each also utilize non-compatible tuning parameters and such. A unified code base can potentially reduce these differences. We might have a single JVM that incorporates the best performance features of all three products, and can be tuned in a consistent way.
AIXtreme wrote: I would like to know which parts of Java aren't being open-sourced. I do hope they aren't critical. Having shunned away from Java due to its license for years, I look forward to another good free-as-in-speech tool under my belt.
rca66 wrote: Just to make it clear: Java is going to have the GPL with the Classpath-exception, which explicitely allows to create closed source applications when using the standard libraries. See Gosling's blog: http://blogs.sun.com/jag/ and here you'll find the mentioned exception: http://www.gnu.org/software/classpath/license.html.
Rik Sweeney wrote: My only worry is is that we'll see applications built on custom versions of Java that aren't compatible with each other or have fixed bugs differently to how someone else has fixed them. Hopefully Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora will just take the current version of Java, compile it with all the bugs still intact (I'm not kidding!!) and stick it in the repositories.
Tpenta wrote: The class libraries have the linking exception. Tp.
Argon wrote: Despite all the rumours, I never really believed Sun would release Java under GPL instead of CDDL. Hats off to Sun. I assume the class libraries are also under GPL. The question I now have is, have they explicitly given a GPL linking exception for the class libraries to avoid GPL tainting Java code? Rather than implicitly saying there's no problem, I hope they make an explicit exception similar to the one given for FSF's libgcc or libstdc++.
SOA World Latest Stories
"I focus on what we are calling CAST Highlight, which is our SaaS application portfolio analysis tool. It is an extremely lightweight tool that can integrate with pretty much any build process right now," explained Andrew Siegmund, Application Migration Specialist for CAST, in this SYS...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Synametrics Technologies will exhibit at SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. Synametrics Technologies is a privately held company based in Plainsboro, New Jersey tha...
As many know, the first generation of Cloud Management Platform (CMP) solutions were designed for managing virtual infrastructure (IaaS) and traditional applications. But that's no longer enough to satisfy evolving and complex business requirements. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, ...
DevOps promotes continuous improvement through a culture of collaboration. But in real terms, how do you: Integrate activities across diverse teams and services? Make objective decisions with system-wide visibility? Use feedback loops to enable learning and improvement? With technolog...
Modern software design has fundamentally changed how we manage applications, causing many to turn to containers as the new virtual machine for resource management. As container adoption grows beyond stateless applications to stateful workloads, the need for persistent storage is founda...
The past few years have brought a sea change in the way applications are architected, developed, and consumed—increasing both the complexity of testing and the business impact of software failures. How can software testing professionals keep pace with modern application delivery, given...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET News.com Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)sys-con.com!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)sys-con.com! 201 802-3021


SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers
ADS BY GOOGLE