yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
Cloud Computing
Conference & Expo
November 2-4, 2009 NYC
Register Today and SAVE !..

2008 West
Data Direct
SOA, WOA and Cloud Computing: The New Frontier for Data Services
Red Hat
The Opening of Virtualization
User Environment Management – The Third Layer of the Desktop
Cloud Computing for Business Agility
CMIS: A Multi-Vendor Proposal for a Service-Based Content Management Interoperability Standard
Freedom OSS
Practical SOA” Max Yankelevich
Architecting an Enterprise Service Router (ESR) – A Cost-Effective Way to Scale SOA Across the Enterprise
Return on Assests: Bringing Visibility to your SOA Strategy
Managing Hybrid Endpoint Environments
Game-Changing Technology for Enterprise Clouds and Applications
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts

2008 West
Get ‘Rich’ Quick: Rapid Prototyping for RIA with ZERO Server Code
Keynote Systems
Designing for and Managing Performance in the New Frontier of Rich Internet Applications
How Can AJAX Improve Homeland Security?
Beyond Widgets: What a RIA Platform Should Offer
REAs: Rich Enterprise Applications
Click For 2008 Event Webcasts
In many cases, the end of the year gives you time to step back and take stock of the last 12 months. This is when many of us take a hard look at what worked and what did not, complete performance reviews, and formulate plans for the coming year. For me, it is all of those things plus a time when I u...
Developing Quality Technical Information: Third Edition
A Handbook for Writers and Editors

As an enterprise and software architect the one thing I hate most about my job is documentation, yet the importance of doing documentation on sizable projects is what I find myself preaching about the most.

One reason I understand the importance of documentation is that I came from an electronic engineering background. As an electronic engineer 93% - 97% of my time was consumed doing proof of concepts and documentation. Almost all of that time was documentation.

It was just my luck that my boss was an English grammar teacher before moving into engineering. My documents came back very bloody. He used a red pen to mark up my documents. It took me 2 years, and a whole lot of tongue biting, but I started getting papers through him without a red mark. I still remember the first one. I walked outside to where the smokers took their breaks and let out a screaming "YES, Finally!!!"

I have been without my grammar teaching boss for over 18 years now, and I am pretty sure if he came across the book reviews I am writing now, he would be sending me bloodied up copies!!! I really needed this book!!

Technical documentation is a hard skill set to learn, at least doing good technical documentation is. I have been on Template Zombie projects where teams considered documentation complete when they had filled in enough templates to overwhelm the customer to the point where they would not have time to review 1/10 of what was being written.

One project I was on built a documentation generator so it was easier to duplicate documents and only change the title and a few pieces of content. The sad part of that project was they got paid for each document handed in. The criteria for getting paid for use cases were that they had to have something underneath every heading in the document.

Documentation should not be something you check off of the project's task list, it should add value to the project or it should not be done. This book will definitely help you make valuable documentation. I have listed the chapters below to give you an idea of what the book covers.

Part 1: Introduction
Chapter 1. Technical information continues to evolve
Chapter 2. Developing quality technical information

Part 2: Easy to use
Chapter 3. Task orientation
Chapter 4. Accuracy
Chapter 5. Completeness

Part 3: Easy to understand
Chapter 6. Clarity
Chapter 7. Concreteness
Chapter 8. Style

Part 4: Easy to find
Chapter 9. Organization
Chapter 10. Retrievability
Chapter 11. Visual effectiveness

Part 5: Putting it all together
Chapter 12. Applying more than one quality characteristic
Chapter 13. Reviewing, testing, and evaluating technical information

Part 6: Appendixes
Appendix A. Quality checklist
Appendix B. Who checks which characteristics?
Resources and references

When I came into the Dot Com Boom I found some software engineering, but most of what I found was the wild west and cowboy coding running rampant. The industry has not changed much since then. We just gave names to the chaotic processes to justify our lack of discipline. I continued my engineering practices and quickly learned how to document software processes and architectures, but convincing others to do it was a different story.

The only way I have been able to show it has value is do it myself. After the team sees I am willing to suffer the boredom of documentation they tend to step in and help. That wouldn't happen if we didn't make use of the documentation and they didn't see value in it.

It has been years since I have had someone to officially review it. This book really helps keep the important things in mind, and since there is no one else to review it, I can use all the help I can get. Right now one of the things I do to catch issues in my documents is have them spoken back to me using the speech capabilities on my computers. This helps me catch sentence structure issues, and some typos. It doesn't catch using the wrong their/there, insure/ensure, except/accept, and many more like sounding words that I mess up.

I use Sparx Enterprise Architect to document systems. Behind every diagram you find the information that explains them. If that information is not simple to understand, and easy to read, the diagram's value falls greatly.

Throughout the process you need to write for several different audiences. Your stakeholders are interested in different aspects of the system. Creating a clear view of what each type of stakeholder wants to see is a painful process, but it always pays off.

It makes me think about the solution from angles I normally wouldn't. Not only think about them, but diagram and describe them in a way that the solution's diagrams and associated documents can stand on their own. It makes me justify and clarify all the decisions made about the system, before it is in production!

Doing documentation is like coding. You start with a shell of what you are building, and you add the details to the different topics with each iteration of your development cycle. Your goal- to make simple, complete, accurate, logical, easy to understand documents. That is exactly what this book will guide you to do.

There are tons of examples showing the original text, diagram, or screen shot of a design, and then the revised version. There are two really cool appendices and a nice glossary. The first appendix is a huge checklist for quality characteristic. The second appendix is a big chart showing which roles should be reviewing the different aspects of the document.

Over all I found every chapter of this book valuable. As time goes on, the hardest part for me is keeping it all in mind. For that reason, this book will be staying by my side just like each of my current most useful programming books. If you do any documenting of software systems, this is a must read. Every software architect, enterprise architect, CIO, developer, tester, and project manager working on a software project, should have this book in his or her hands. You own to your stakeholders and yourself.

Developing Quality Technical Information: A Handbook for Writers and Editors (3rd Edition)

Developing Quality Technical Information: A Handbook for Writers and Editors (3rd Edition)
About Tad Anderson
Tad Anderson has been doing Software Architecture for 18 years and Enterprise Architecture for the past few.

SOA World Latest Stories
"We started a Master of Science in business analytics - that's the hot topic. We serve the business community around San Francisco so we educate the working professionals and this is where they all want to be," explained Judy Lee, Associate Professor and Department Chair at Golden Gate...
There is a huge demand for responsive, real-time mobile and web experiences, but current architectural patterns do not easily accommodate applications that respond to events in real time. Common solutions using message queues or HTTP long-polling quickly lead to resiliency, scalability...
We call it DevOps but much of the time there’s a lot more discussion about the needs and concerns of developers than there is about other groups. There’s a focus on improved and less isolated developer workflows. There are many discussions around collaboration, continuous integration a...
The dynamic nature of the cloud means that change is a constant when it comes to modern cloud-based infrastructure. Delivering modern applications to end users, therefore, is a constantly shifting challenge. Delivery automation helps IT Ops teams ensure that apps are providing an optim...
Modern software design has fundamentally changed how we manage applications, causing many to turn to containers as the new virtual machine for resource management. As container adoption grows beyond stateless applications to stateful workloads, the need for persistent storage is founda...
"CA has been doing a lot of things in the area of DevOps. Now we have a complete set of tool sets in order to enable customers to go all the way from planning to development to testing down to release into the operations," explained Aruna Ravichandran, Vice President of Global Marketin...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)! 201 802-3021

SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers