Comments
yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
Cloud Computing
Conference & Expo
November 2-4, 2009 NYC
Register Today and SAVE !..

2008 West
DIAMOND SPONSOR:
Data Direct
SOA, WOA and Cloud Computing: The New Frontier for Data Services
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Red Hat
The Opening of Virtualization
GOLD SPONSORS:
Appsense
User Environment Management – The Third Layer of the Desktop
Cordys
Cloud Computing for Business Agility
EMC
CMIS: A Multi-Vendor Proposal for a Service-Based Content Management Interoperability Standard
Freedom OSS
Practical SOA” Max Yankelevich
Intel
Architecting an Enterprise Service Router (ESR) – A Cost-Effective Way to Scale SOA Across the Enterprise
Sensedia
Return on Assests: Bringing Visibility to your SOA Strategy
Symantec
Managing Hybrid Endpoint Environments
VMWare
Game-Changing Technology for Enterprise Clouds and Applications
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts

2008 West
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Appcelerator
Get ‘Rich’ Quick: Rapid Prototyping for RIA with ZERO Server Code
Keynote Systems
Designing for and Managing Performance in the New Frontier of Rich Internet Applications
GOLD SPONSORS:
ICEsoft
How Can AJAX Improve Homeland Security?
Isomorphic
Beyond Widgets: What a RIA Platform Should Offer
Oracle
REAs: Rich Enterprise Applications
Click For 2008 Event Webcasts
In many cases, the end of the year gives you time to step back and take stock of the last 12 months. This is when many of us take a hard look at what worked and what did not, complete performance reviews, and formulate plans for the coming year. For me, it is all of those things plus a time when I u...
SYS-CON.TV
The Loki Drama Rears its Head Again
The Loki Drama Rears its Head Again

If you want to know a major reason that many major game publishers are hesitant to strike into the Linux market, there is a one-word answer: Loki. The demise of Loki Software, a company that once existed solely to provide ports of major game clients for the Linux market, has put an edge of fear into major game publishers that the Linux market simply will not purchase enough games to cover the costs of the extra coding.

The problem, of course, is that (depending on who you talk to), the death of Loki Software had to do with many, many things, not just the game purchasing market. What these other things are is of course open to debate, and to properly discuss them in a public forum requires judicious use of the word "alleged" if to protect from lawsuits and from spreading potential "just a rumor" information as the truth and nothing but the truth.

In an interview with The Linux Show, "Linux and Main" editor and publisher Dennis Powell revealed that in May 2003 he found out the hard way that there are players in the Loki drama who indeed turn to the courts to settle alleged disputes. Loki's founder and CEO Scott Draeker, brought a lawsuit in May 2003 against Linux and Main and Powell as its editor and publisher, for defamation of character.

While Powell's attorney hopes to have the case thrown out, the Linux gaming industry and community might in fact be better off seeing this case go to court. Perhaps having Draeker try to prove that he was truly damaged by the trio of published articles - as compared, for example, to the many online and offline discussions that no doubt said far worse - and having Powell defend his position would possibly help the major game publishers understand that Loki's demise might not have been caused by a "cheap" Linux market after all.

On top of this, of course, is the fact that Linux is in use on far more desktops today than in 2001. In some ways, Loki may have been an idea slightly ahead of its time. I'd like to hope that a game publisher putting a serious effort into Linux clients today would find an enthusiastic buying public, considering that a majority of Linux desktop users tell me that the only reason they keep Windows around at all for the desktop is for playing games.

Personally, I'd rather not play games at all than have to keep dual booting into an operating system I find less and less familiar - not to mention having to keep an otherwise unused Windows installation up to date with security patches, hardware drivers (after all, games push machines enough that you want to make sure to have the very latest), and more.

About Dee-Ann LeBlanc
Dee-Ann LeBlanc has been involved with Linux since 1994. She is the author of 12 books, 130 articles, and has more of both coming. She is a trainer, a course developer - including the official Red Hat online courseware at DigitalThink - a founding member of the AnswerSquad, and a consultant.

In order to post a comment you need to be registered and logged in.

Register | Sign-in

Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

The poor performance of linux as gaming platform was not loki`s fault. It was because of the lack of support of hardware manifacturers, who refused to meet its duties and make (opensource?) drivers for Linux.Many of them refused even to give the documentation on their chips.
The result was that all linux distributions at this time had problems with 3D rendering configuration whis was not possible for the average gamer.

As much as I hate to say it and with all due respect,I don't think the author is much of a gamer.

Based on her comment that she would rather not play games on a little used OS fails to understand that the people heavily into gaming on the PC will put up with all sorts of rubish in the OS in order to play the latest and greatest games.

For a prime example of this concider the Windows 9x BSOD, this happened often and yet it was in the heyday of this that PC gaming boomed. And to the present Windows XP, bloated and poor performing but still people will put up with it to play games like UT2004 and World of Warcraft(beta).

Initiatives such as WineX are bluring the lines now and more power to them, however native execution of the latest and greatest games would be a huge boost to Linux on the Desktop in homes. Personally I was greatly dissapointed when Loki failed, at that time I was just beginning to check Linux out (Redhat 6.0, Mandrake 7.0)and was looking forward to being able to play major release games on Linux, sigh!

Just my 2c.


Your Feedback
Angello ( from Bulgaria ) wrote: The poor performance of linux as gaming platform was not loki`s fault. It was because of the lack of support of hardware manifacturers, who refused to meet its duties and make (opensource?) drivers for Linux.Many of them refused even to give the documentation on their chips. The result was that all linux distributions at this time had problems with 3D rendering configuration whis was not possible for the average gamer.
Chris Burton wrote: As much as I hate to say it and with all due respect,I don't think the author is much of a gamer. Based on her comment that she would rather not play games on a little used OS fails to understand that the people heavily into gaming on the PC will put up with all sorts of rubish in the OS in order to play the latest and greatest games. For a prime example of this concider the Windows 9x BSOD, this happened often and yet it was in the heyday of this that PC gaming boomed. And to the present Windows XP, bloated and poor performing but still people will put up with it to play games like UT2004 and World of Warcraft(beta). Initiatives such as WineX are bluring the lines now and more power to them, however native execution of the latest and greatest games would be a huge boost to Linux on the Desktop in homes. Personally I was greatly dissapointed when Loki failed, at that time I was...
SOA World Latest Stories
In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Mike Johnston, an infrastructure engineer at Supergiant.io, discussed how to use Kubernetes to set up a SaaS infrastructure for your business. Mike Johnston is an infrastructure engineer at Supergiant.io with over 12 years of experience designing, dep...
SYS-CON Events announced today that DatacenterDynamics has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 18th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 7–9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. DatacenterDynamics is a brand of DCD Group, a global B2B media and publ...
Most DevOps journeys involve several phases of maturity. Research shows that the inflection point where organizations begin to see maximum value is when they implement tight integration deploying their code to their infrastructure. Success at this level is the last barrier to at-will d...
DevOpsSummit New York 2018, colocated with CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City. Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with the introduction of DXWorldEXPO within the program. Successful transformation requires a laser focus ...
"We do one of the best file systems in the world. We learned how to deal with Big Data many years ago and we implemented this knowledge into our software," explained Jakub Ratajczak, Business Development Manager at MooseFS, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8...
Adding public cloud resources to an existing application can be a daunting process. The tools that you currently use to manage the software and hardware outside the cloud aren’t always the best tools to efficiently grow into the cloud. All of the major configuration management tools ha...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET News.com Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)sys-con.com!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)sys-con.com! 201 802-3021


SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers
ADS BY GOOGLE